1(800) 964-7903

1083 Pit Road Java Center, NY 14082

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Therapeutic Recreation/Recreation Therapy

Therapeutic Recreation/Recreational Therapy is a treatment service designed to restore, remediate and rehabilitate a person’s level of functioning and independence in life activities, introduce stress management and resiliency tools to promote health and wellness as well as reduce or eliminate the activity limitations and restrictions to participation in life situations caused by an illness or disabling condition.

Please contact your conference coordinator to add a therapeutic recreation element to your next event.

The Leisure/Recreation Activities provide:

Mental:

  • Leisure education/leisure awareness
  • Opportunities to experience mental clarity:

o increase alertness

o improve decision making skills

o goal planning and plan execution

o improve strategic thinking

  • Long term planning for maintaining an active lifestyle
  • Development of stress management skills

Social:

  • Opportunities for collaboration and creation of goals
  • Social connectedness and building a sense of community

o Accountability

o Camaraderie

  • Opportunities to create, access, and utilize peer support
  • Opportunities to develop and enhance the social skills required for integration into the community setting
  • Fun and relaxation (away from the demands of school/work/daily tasks)
  • Build social confidence
  • Development of stress management skills

Physical:

  • Enhance/improve cardiovascular endurance
  • Improve flexibility
  • Improve everyone’s overall health and wellness 
  • Improve muscle tone and strength
  • Increased energy
  • Exposure to a variety of modalities

o Understanding one’s ability

  • Development of stress management skills

Emotional:

  • Opportunities to define positive coping skills specific to individual or group’s needs
  • Develop and identify resiliency strengths
  • Gain the confidence to go beyond self-imposed limits

o Enhance understanding of one’s ability

o Opportunities to seek out new challenges

o Breakdown barriers

  • Opportunities to improve self-esteem

o Build resilience

  • Gain an understanding and experience the benefits of relaxation and mindfulness
  • Improve self-awareness
  • Build a sense of optimism
  • Development of stress management skills
  • Identify values and purpose

Debrief format for recreation and leisure activities:

  • “What” - objective

o What happened? What did you do? What did you expect and what was different?

  • “So what” – interpretive

o Why does that matter - to you or to your partner/group/unit?

  • “Now what” – decisional

o What have you learned? What will you do different? What support do you need? What goals have you set for yourself related to the activity?

o How do you plan to utilize the materials/resources/tools

Recreation and Leisure Activities at Beaver Hollow:

 

 All Year Round

Spring/Summer/Fall

Winter

Hiking
Bonfires
Scavenger Hunts
Pool Volleyball
Shuffleboard
Team Triathlon
Journaling
Pool Basketball

Fishing
Row Boats
Bocce
Reflexology Path
Basketball
Volleyball
Tennis
Croquet

Snowshoeing
Cross Country Skiing
Snow Sculptures
Sledding
Snow Forts

Suggested Packing List for Recreation and Leisure Activities:

Clothing
Exercise wear/comfortable clothes for morning movement
Casual clothing
1 swimsuit
Jacket and/or sweatshirt
Hat, Visor or Beanie
Rain gear
Light hiking or walking shoes (trail runners)
Pool shoes/Flip flops

Winter (late Fall/early Spring)
Winter Boots/Hiking Boots
Winter Jacket
Hats, Gloves
Warm Clothes for layering
Snow Pants

Other
Bug Spray
Camera
Sunglasses
Sunscreen and protective apparel
Small first aid kit
Be sure to pack your prescription medication

Weather Information: Below is seasonal weather information
to help you pack for your stay at Beaver Hollow. We
recommend checking the current weather for your desired
stay to ensure you are packed appropriately.

Winter Temps. (Dec-Feb): 15-35 degrees
Spring Temps. (Mar-May): 22-66 degrees
Summer Temps. (Jun-Aug): 53-78 degrees
Fall Temps. (Sep-Nov): 31-70 degrees

HIKING

Winding through our property are roughly four miles of well-marked, groomed trails. In addition to the numerous general health and fitness benefits of hiking, it can be used to practice various stress management tools such as mindfulness and meditation, deep breathing, body scanning, stretching, etc.

Outcomes:

  • Build muscle strength and improve balance (uneven terrain can work muscles while improving balance and stability)
  • Decrease tension and anxiety
  • Develop stress management skills and resilience
  • Breakdown barriers and understand one’s ability
  • Gain an understanding and experience the benefits of mindfulness and deep breathing

Tools to try while hiking:

  • Deep breathing: Practice after walking uphill to experience the effectiveness of 4-5 cycles of deep breathing in order to prepare for when your body is under emotional or mental stress o Stand with your feet hip-width apart and balance your weight evenly on both feet
    • Inhale for a count of 4 seconds
    • Hold for a count of 3 seconds
    • Inhale for a count of 5 seconds
    • Repeat for ~1 minute or after 4-5 cycles
  • Body Scanning: Practice before and after hike to note the differences in how your body feels pre/post hike o Stand with your feet hip-width apart and balance your weight evenly on both feet - take the time to notice and feel the stability of the ground beneath you
    • Take 3-5 deep breaths - inhaling through your nose, exhaling through your mouth
    • Close your eyes and do a scan of your whole body, starting at your feet. Make note of any sensations, thoughts or feelings and take the time to explore the sensations fully.
    • Bring your awareness to your body, noticing how your body feels as you are standing, and becoming aware of all the sensations going on in your body
    • Be aware of what was noticed throughout your body, and compare to after the hike
  • Mindfulness: Practice throughout the hike to consciously engage senses to notice your surroundings
    • Consciously engage your senses to bring yourself into the present moment and deepen your connection to your surroundings
      • Look and take in what you see; the sky, clouds, plants, wildlife, etc. Are there patterns, colors, or subtle details that you may have missed at first glance?
      • Listen and tune into the sounds around you; the wind in the trees, the sound of birds or insects, vehicles driving by in the distance, a babbling creek
      • Tune in to the sensations you physically feel; the wind or sun on your skin, the softness or firmness of the ground beneath your feet, the texture of tree bark nearby
      • Bring conscious awareness to your sense of smell; the earthy smell of the soil, pine trees, nearby bodies of water, leaves  

SNOWSHOEING

Winding through our property are roughly four miles of well-marked, groomed trails. In addition to the numerous general health and fitness benefits of snowshoeing, it can be used to practice various stress management tools such as mindfulness and meditation, deep breathing, body scanning, stretching, etc.

Outcomes:

  • Build muscle strength and improve balance (uneven terrain can work muscles while improving balance and stability)
  • Decrease tension and anxiety
  • Develop stress management skills and resilience
  • Breakdown barriers and understand one’s ability
  • Gain an understanding and experience the benefits of mindfulness and deep breathing

Tools to try while snowshoeing:

  • Deep breathing: Practice after walking uphill to experience the effectiveness of 4-5 cycles of deep breathing in order to prepare for when your body is under emotional or mental stress
    • Stand with your feet hip-width apart and balance your weight evenly on both feet
    • Inhale for a count of 4 seconds
    • Hold for a count of 3 seconds
    • Inhale for a count of 5 seconds
    • Repeat for ~1 minute or after 4-5 cycles
  • Body Scanning: Practice before and after hike to note the differences in how your body feels pre/post hike o Stand with your feet hip-width apart and balance your weight evenly on both feet - take the time to notice and feel the stability of the ground beneath you
    • Take 3-5 deep breaths - inhaling through your nose, exhaling through your mouth
    • Close your eyes and do a scan of your whole body, starting at your feet. Make note of any sensations, thoughts or feelings and take the time to explore the sensations fully.
    • Bring your awareness to your body, noticing how your body feels as you are standing, and becoming aware of all the sensations going on in your body
    • Be aware of what was noticed throughout your body, and compare to after the hike
  • Mindfulness: Practice throughout the hike to consciously engage senses to notice your surroundings
    • Consciously engage your senses to bring yourself into the present moment and deepen your connection to your surroundings
      • Look and take in what you see; the sky, clouds, plants, wildlife, etc. Are there patterns, colors, or subtle details that you may have missed at first glance?
      • Listen and tune into the sounds around you; the wind in the trees, birds, snow falling off branches, vehicles driving by in the distance, a babbling creek
      • Tune in to the sensations you physically feel; the wind or sun on your skin, the softness or firmness of the ground beneath your feet, the texture of tree bark nearby, snowflakes landing on your face, the crunch of ice beneath your feet
      • Bring conscious awareness to your sense of smell; pine trees, nearby bodies of water, leaves, snow, food being cooked nearby

FISHING

Our 20-acre lake is loaded with a variety of different species just waiting to jump on a fishing line. We view Fishing as a mindful experience. It is one of those activities that bring back memories of childhood. Fishing is an activity can truly promote mindfulness and through the experience can also be a form of meditation; providing a means to reduce stress along with other health benefits.

Outcomes:

  • Shared experiences help strengthen relationships with family/friends
  • Mindfulness and relaxation
  • Develop patience
  • Process improvement
  • Improve balance
  • Increase mood

Fishing can be done from the shoreline, docks, and row boats. Poles, PFDs (use when on boats), and tacklebox materials are located at the dock and beach area.

The following discussion points are reviewed by the facilitator to prepare participants for the activity and review any potential questions the group may have:

  • Description of the variety of fish that inhabit our lake
  • How to string a reel
  • How tie a hook
  • How to tie and lure and sinker
  • How to properly cast a line into the water
  • Where to fish; the shore, water depth and structure in the water
  • Where fish tend to hide
  • How to use rowboats onsite if participants are interested in fishing from the boats

Tool to try while fishing:

  • Mindfulness: Practice throughout your fishing experience to consciously engage senses to notice your surroundings
    • Consciously engage your senses to bring yourself into the present moment and deepen your connection to your surroundings
      • Look and take in what you see; the sky, clouds, plants, wildlife, etc. Are there patterns, colors, or subtle details that you may have missed at first glance?
      • Listen and tune into the sounds around you; the wind in the trees, birds, vehicles driving by in the distance, moving water, waves against the boat
      • Tune in to the sensations you physically feel; the wind or sun on your skin, the softness or firmness of the ground beneath your feet, the gentle rock of the boat as you sit on the water
      • Bring conscious awareness to your sense of smell; pine trees, water, leaves, food being cooked nearby

ROWBOATS

Our 20-acre lake is the perfect place to utilize our row boats and experience all of the health benefits that go with it. Open water rowing is a low impact full body workout targeting your arms, legs, chest, back, and abs in addition to experiencing a cardio workout. Rowing can also be utilized to relieve stress and connect with nature while promoting mindfulness. Rowing can also be used to practice mediation and to meditate through the rhythmic, repetitive motion of your stroke.

Outcomes:

  • Shared experiences help strengthen relationships with family/friends
  • Mindfulness and relaxation
  • Develop patience
  • Process improvement
  • Improved range of motion
  • Improve muscle tone and strength
  • Improve mood

The following discussion points are reviewed by the facilitator to prepare participants for the activity and review any potential questions the group may have:

  • Description of the two boat sizes we have available
  • How to wear the PFD – one PFD for each person in the boat
  • Identifying the bow and stern of the boat
  • How to push boat off from shore
  • How to row the boat
  • How to exit boat
  • Where to return boats to

Tool to try while row-boating:

  • Mindfulness: Practice throughout your fishing experience to consciously engage senses to notice your surroundings
    • Consciously engage your senses to bring yourself into the present moment and deepen your connection to your surroundings
      • Look and take in what you see; the sky, clouds, plants, wildlife, etc. Are there patterns, colors, or subtle details that you may have missed at first glance?
      • Listen and tune into the sounds around you; the wind in the trees, birds, vehicles driving by in the distance, moving water, waves against the boat
      • Tune in to the sensations you physically feel; the wind or sun on your skin, the softness or firmness of the ground beneath your feet, the gentle rock of the boat as you sit on the water
      • Bring conscious awareness to your sense of smell; pine trees, water, leaves, food being cooked nearby

JOURNALING

Journaling provides individuals an opportunity for self-reflection which often leads to improved self-efficacy. Through the use of mindfulness and self-reflection, journaling provides an opportunity to call a wandering mind to attention, from passivity to actively engaging with your thoughts.

Outcomes:

  • Improved memory
  • Mindfulness and relaxation
  • Decrease stress
  • Increase self-awareness
  • Encourage self-expression
  • Practice goal planning/execution

Journaling prompts to try:

  • Do a worry purge in the pages of your journal. Without stopping, write down everything that is churning around in your mind. Once it is out of your head, give yourself permission to leave it in your journal and come back to it later with a clearer head.
  • Finish the sentence, “Right now, I am…” Then finish the sentence, “I want to be…”
  • Write a list of the day’s accomplishments and victories, no matter how small. Celebrate each one individually.
  • Sit quietly for a few minutes, just breathing and listening to your body, before you start journaling. What is it telling you? Where do you feel strong, healthy, energetic, relaxed? Where do you feel tense, worried, uncomfortable, tired? What is asking for more attention?
  • Have a heart-to-heart talk with your inner critic. If she has been extra vocal today, take this opportunity to dismiss her opinions and tell her to hit the road. If he has been telling you all the things you are doing wrong, reply with all the things you are doing right.
  • Pick a single positive word that you want to focus on today – such as joy, gratitude, love or courage. Journal about all the ways you have experienced this word lately and all the ways you want to.
  • Journal about a habit or activity you do that improves your mood or stress level without fail. Describe how you transform when you are engaged in this practice. How do you feel? How can you do this more often?
  • Tell a story in which you made a positive difference in someone’s life. How did you change them for the better? How did it change you? What does this reflect about you as a person?
  • Think about how you would spend a day doing only the things that make you feel excited, happy, engaged or fulfilled. Free-write a list of everything you would include in this day, from the time you wake up until you head to bed at night. Reread your list and choose at least one item to incorporate into your schedule today.

COLORING PAGES

Through the utilization of the mandala style coloring pages, there is an opportunity to practice meditation by allowing one’s brain to enter a relaxed state. With coloring and focusing on the intricate designs of the coloring page, one can focus on the present moment and block out the nonstop thinking which is helpful for practicing mindfulness and meditation techniques.

Outcomes:

  • Mindfulness and relaxation
  • Decrease stress and anxiety
  • Enhance creativity
  • Increase self-awareness
  • Encourage self-expression
  • Have fun, alone or with your friends

Reasons to try coloring pages:

  • Allows you to practice mindfulness and meditation techniques through a simple act by taking your attention away from yourself and bringing your focus to the present moment.
  • Coloring allows you to relax your brain by focusing on a simple activity
  • The outcome of coloring is known – having a predictable outcome can be relaxing in itself

Examples of the various themes of coloring pages:

  • Animal
    • Cat
    • Dog
    • Owl
    • Butterfly
  • Ocean
  • Nature
  • Floral
  • Seasons
  • Travel
  • Movies
  • Television shows

Coloring tools that can be used:

  • Colored pencils
  • Fine tipped markers
  • Colored pens
  • Crayons

Facilitated Activities

Mask: This facilitated activity is a project that encourages self-reflection, expression, through utilizing creativity skills and it can be helpful for facilitators to start difficult conversations with participants.

Outcomes:

  • Creative thinking
  • Self-expression
  • Communication
  • Increase self-awareness

How to:

  1. Facilitator will distribute a mask to each group member and explain the inner out outer sides of the mask (one mask per participant)
  2. Each participant will start with the inside of the mask first. Facilitator will explain that for this side of the mask participants will draw/color their representation of their inner self, that they hide from the world
  3. After each participant has completed the inside of their mask, the facilitator will instruct participants to move to the outside/front of the mask where they will draw/color their representation of what they show the world
  4. Facilitators responsibilities throughout this activity include:
  • emphasize to the group that this is a “safe space” where the participant can express themselves
    • This can lead to conversations on self-awareness and self-acceptance
    • Help participants to identify the difference between what the participants communicate with others versus what he/she is actually feeling
      • This can lead to conversations on healthy communication

Debrief:

  1. Please explain the drawings you created. How did it feel to have a visual representation for each side?
  2. How are the drawings different? How are they the same?
  3. What do the colors mean to you?
  4. What did you learn about yourself in the overall process?

Photography Scavenger Hunt

We at Beaver Hollow have created a Photography Scavenger Hunt that is truly unique to Beaver Hollow! A facilitator will lead the group through one of our nature trails to predetermined stops along the way. At each stop facilitator will encourage participants to become more mindful of their experience and aware of positive emotions they are experiencing. Each picture snapped at a predetermined stop in relation to the positive emotion being discussed will result in a series of pictures participants are able to leave our site with.

Outcomes: Decision making, positive recall, mindfulness, shared experience, communication

Time: 60 min

Indoor/Outdoor

Small group/Medium group/Large group

Setup: 5 predetermined spots along the trails with scenic views of the lodge, wooded areas, water sources, open space

Materials: disposable cameras, cell phone cameras, emotion wheel

How to:

  1. Facilitator has the option to open this activity with a quote “positive emotions are worth cultivating, not just as end states in themselves but also as a means to achieving psychological growth and improved well-being over time.” – The Role of Positive Emotions in Positive Psychology, The Broaden-and-Build Theory of Positive Emotions
  2. Facilitator will explain that this activity is designed to focus thoughts on positive feelings and use them to broaden their thought – actions. For example, joy may create an urge to play, push limits, and be creative.
  3. Facilitator will encourage participants to look at various objects while at each designated spot and be mindful of what promotes positive emotion in that moment, and to take a picture of that object
  • Photos can be of animals, colors, plants, scenes, etc.
  1. Participants will spend 10 – 15 minutes at each photo site taking pictures of nature that are focused on each emotion category
  • Stop 1: Satisfaction, contentment, enjoyment, amusement
  • Stop 2: Hope, optimism, eagerness
  • Stop 3: Enthusiasm, excitement, delight
  • Stop 4: Affection, caring, kindness
  • Stop 5: Joy, pride, delight
  1. At each stop, allow for at least 5 – 10 min to discuss a connection of how and when emotions are felt here taking pictures or occurring in real life or how they can be facilitated
  2. Facilitator should also do a brief check in at each photo stop to encourage participants to tune in with their bodies emotions, and be mindful of what promotes positive emotions.
  • This can also be used as an opportunity to do a body inventory and check in with how body is physically feeling

Debrief:

  1. Which positive feelings did you experience today that you can relate most to your usual daily activities?
  2. What things in your community can you take pictures of that can elicit similar emotions as today?

Scavenger Hunt

We at Beaver Hollow have created a Scavenger Hunt that is truly unique to Beaver Hollow! We divide the Group into smaller Teams, present the challenge, distribute the instructions, establish the time frame, and start the Hunt! Teams must use their collective resources to search for various items as well as completing other aspects of the Hunt. This Activity builds teamwork while being a lot of fun!

Outcomes: Communication, roles and responsibilities, leadership, team unification

Time: 60 – 90 min

Indoor/Outdoor

Small group/Medium group/Large group

Setup: print out instruction pages per team

Materials: scavenger hunt materials, printed instructions per team

How to:

  1. Facilitator will divide group in to teams of no more than 6 people and present the teams that the challenge is a scavenger hunt
  2. Facilitator will distribute the instructions to each team and establish the time frame for the task to be completed
  3. Throughout the established time, teams must use their collective resources to search for various items as well as completing other aspects of the Hunt

Debrief:

  1. What skills were necessary in order to successfully complete the task?
  2. In what ways did you communicate well?
  3. How effective is the communication in your group?
  4. Did you utilize all of the available resources?
  5. What strengths and skills did you utilize throughout this activity that can be applied to other situations in your life?

Team Triathlon: Teams will get to compete against one another to complete a triathlon event composed of various activities.

Outcomes:

  • Communication
  • Problem solving
  • Trust
  • Cooperation/competition
  • Establish roles and responsibilities

Materials: rope, trolley pieces, row boats, life jackets

How to:

  1. Facilitator will divide group into teams of 15 – 20 people and describe that each team will compete for an overall score by competing in the following events:
  • Four legged race: Teams of 15-21 will break down into smaller teams of 3 and 6 legs become 4 by tying two together using rope handcuffs rope or other rope.
    • It’s important to make sure the participants’ ankles are together; there should be no slack/gap between the ankles of the partners
    • Lifting the middle person is not allowed
    • The Race takes place on the berm for distance of 100 feet
    • Completion times of all sub teams will be averaged to achieve a Team time score.
    • Trolley: Team of 20 will break down into 4 sub-teams of 5 people and walk the trolley 30 feet to finish line on beach
      • Any foot falling off the trolley will result in 30 seconds of backward walking.
      • Completion times of four sub teams will be added together for one rotation team time score.
      • Row boat: Team of 20 will break down into 5 sub-teams of 4 people and must paddle 5 rowboats around the buoy and back to shore, using oars as paddles and other “paddle materials” ie: paper plates or pool noodles
        • Two life jackets per boat
        • Completion times of five sub teams will be added together for one rotation team time score.

Debrief:

  1. What skills did you and your team use in order to be successful in completing this activity?
  2. What was your goal for this activity? How realistic was your goal?
  3. What did you learn from this activity?
  4. Did you learn anything new about yourself? Group members?
  5. How can you use what you learned today in other situations?

Reflexology Path: Groups will be exposed to different tools and resources that can be utilized for reflexology

Outcomes:

  • Relaxation
  • Reduce stress
  • Self-awareness
  • Self-care

How to:

  1. Facilitator will lead group to reflexology path, distribute “foot” map to participants to pass around and look at
  2. Facilitator will explain that the “Reflexology Foot Path” is a path designed to massage and stimulate acupressure points on the soles of the feet, which are connected to various energy meridians of the body.
  3. Facilitator will instruct group members to take their time and walk slowly down the path. It is not intended for participants to force so much pressure that it is painful for them to walk on the path.
  4. Facilitator should remind participants to focus on breathing throughout their walk on the path and note areas of the foot they experience discomfort and try to work on that area the next time
  5. Facilitator can suggest alternative methods of walking:
  • Take steps by using the front soles only
  • Alternate and take steps by using the heel base only
  • Spread toes and have their sides massaged by surrounding stones
  • Massage the sides of feet by placing them between two large stones
  • Massage the tops of the toes by putting them in front of other stones
  • Find small stones on the path and stand on the soles of feet
  1. Participants are encouraged to take small breaks, sit down and massage their feet if necessary
  2. This activity can be done in progressions, and participants may want to increase their time spent on the path and try to incorporate it into their regular routine.
  3. Facilitator will encourage participants to drink plenty of water after session, just as one might do when receiving a different type of massage – it will help to flush out toxins
  4. Other variations may include: utilize the reflexology mats, show participants different household items (ie: wine cork or golf ball) or various sports balls that can be used to the same effect as the stones on the pathway.

Debrief:

  1. What was your goal for this activity? How realistic was your goal?
  2. What skills were necessary in order to successfully complete the task?
  3. What strengths and skills did you utilize throughout this activity that can be applied to other situations in your life?

Other recreation and leisure activities:

Bocce: Played with eight large balls and one smaller target or object ball called a pallino. There are four balls per team and they are made of a different color or pattern to distinguish the balls of one team from those of the other team

Outcomes:

  • Hand eye coordination, arm/wrist strength, standing endurance
  • Encourages coming together with friends/family
  • Mindfulness and concentration

Outdoor: small teams made up of 1-4 players, 2 teams per court (3 courts)

How to:

  • The pallino is thrown out by a member of the team having won the coin toss to start the game.
  • The same player throwing the pallino must deliver the first bocce ball.
  • The opposing team will then deliver their bocce balls until the point is taken or they have exhausted their 4 balls.
  • This "nearest ball", rule governs the sequence of thrown balls. The side whose bocce is the closest to the pallino is called the "in" ball and the opposing side the "out" ball. Whenever a team gets "in" it steps aside and allows the "out" team to bowl.
  • A team has the option of rolling, throwing, bouncing, banking, etc. its ball down the court provided it does not go out-of-bounds or the player does not violate the foul markers.
  • A player also has the option of "spocking" or hitting out any ball in play in trying to obtain a point, or decreasing the opposing team's points.
  • At the end of each frame (when both teams have exhausted 4 balls each), a designated official under the scrutiny of the captain/or designee of each team, will determine the points scored.
  • Scoring points are all those ball of one team closer to the pallino than the closest ball of the opposing team, which can be determined by viewing or by mechanical measurement.
  • In the event that the two balls closest to the pallino belong to opposing teams and are exactly the same distance from the pallino, no points will be awarded, and the pallino returns to the team which delivered it.
  • Only balls which are distinguishably closer to the pallino than any opponent's balls may be awarded points.
  • Variations may include: tournament style

Tennis: 2-4 people can play per court, each in need of a racket and one tennis ball per court. Variations to the game may include rallying for fun without keeping scores, doing drills, exercising against a backboard or playing singles or doubles.

Outcomes:

  • improving muscle tone, strength and flexibility
  • increasing reaction times
  • alertness and coordination
  • improve concentration

How to:

  • Players stand on opposite sides of a net and use a stringed racket to hit a ball back and forth to each other
  • The server is given two opportunities to serve the ball within the service court
  • The server should stand before the right side of the baseline and serve the ball diagonally across to the receiver’s right service court and then proceed to serve from his left side of the baseline diagonally across to the receiver’s left service court
  • The point system of a tennis match is as follows:
    • No points are scored = Love
    • 1 point scored = 15 points
    • 2 points scored = 30 points
    • 3 points scored = 40 points
    • 4 points earned = set point (set over)
  • For a tennis player to win a game, he/she must win with at least a two point lead.

Croquet: for 2-6 players the object of the game is to advance your ball through the course scoring points for each wicket and stake in the correct order and direction. The winner is the first side to score 14 wicket points and 2 stake points for each of its balls. In a timed game if the time expires, the team with the most points at the end of the time period wins.

Outcomes:

  • Meeting new people
  • Improved hand eye coordination
  • Improve balance
  • Strategic planning
  • Mental stimulation
  • Improve focus
  • Promote mindfulness

 

Outdoor: 2-6 players

Setup:

 

How to:

  • All balls are played into the game from a spot halfway between the finishing stake and wicket number 1
  • The order of play is blue, red, black, and yellow
  • When four balls are played with two players, the sides are blue/black against red/yellow; with four players (doubles) each player plays one color ball.
  • The scoring system of croquet:

Each ball can score wicket and stake points for its side only by going through a wicket or hitting a stake in the proper order and direction.
Going through a wicket out of order or in the wrong direction is not counted as a point gained or lost.
A ball caused to score its wicket or stake during another ball’s turn earns the point for its side, but no bonus shot is earned as a result.
A ball scores a wicket point only if it comes to rest clear of the playing side of the wicket.
If a ball passes through a wicket but rolls back, it has not scored the wicket.
If a ball travels backwards through its wicket to get position, it must be clear of the non-playing side to then score the wicket in the correct direction.
Because wickets can be loose in the ground, it’s best not to run the side if the mallet head up or down either plane of the wicket. It’s always better to use your judgment sighting by eye

 

 

Basketball: Can be played on the outdoor court or in the pool with two teams of five players each. The purpose of the game is to score on the opposing teams basket by shooting a ball through a hoop elevated above the ground. 

Outcomes:

  • Increase endurance
  • Improve balance and coordination
  • Improve concentration
  • Relaxation and stress management
  • Build shared experiences and help strengthen relationships with family/friends, opportunities to meet new people
  • Mindfulness 

How to:

  • The game is played on a rectangular floor called the court, and there is a hoop at each end. The court is divided into two main sections by the mid-court line.
  • Each team is assigned a basket or goal to defend. This means that the other basket is their scoring basket. At halftime, the teams switch goals.
  • The game begins with one player from either team at center court. A referee will toss the ball up between the two. The player that gets his hands on the ball will tip it to a teammate. This is called a tip-off.
  • When a team makes a basket, they score two points and the ball goes to the other team.
  • Scoring:
    • If a basket is made outside of the three-point arc, then that basket is worth three points.
    • A free throw is worth one point. Free throws are awarded to a team according to some formats involving the number of fouls committed in a half and/or the type of foul committed.
    • Fouling a shooter always results in two or three free throws being awarded the shooter, depending upon where he was when he shot. Variations may include: HORSE/PIG, Knockout
  • Variations of the game may include PIG, HORSE, or Knockout which can be done with small or large groups and everyone uses the same side of the court. 

Shuffle Board: The game of shuffleboard contains elements of strategy and competition that make it appropriate for all ages. It is played by either two (singles) or by four people (doubles). The object of the game is to propel discs by means of a cue onto scoring diagram at opposite end of court - to score, to prevent opponent from scoring, or both. Can be played on the indoor table in the main lodge or the outdoor court by the Grove. 

Outcomes:

  • Improved physical health; hand eye coordination, low impact exercise, improved balance
  • Encourages coming together with friends/family, teams consist of 1 or 2 players
  • Strategic planning
  • Improved concentration
  • Mindfulness and stress management 

How to:

Indoor – Table Game

  • In a two-player game the participants, standing squarely at the same end of the table, take turns shuttling the pucks to the opposite end of the table. The game continues in this fashion until no pucks remain.
  • There are foul lines that must be adhered to when playing.
    • On the player side, you cannot cross the near foul line while the puck is still in your hand.
    • On the scoring side, the puck must cross the far foul line to be eligible for scoring. If the puck does not go past the short or long foul line the puck is immediately removed from the field of play in order as to not obstruct the next player’s shot.
    • If the puck goes beyond the end of the playing surface, or if it falls off to the side into the gutter, that puck is not counted towards the score.
  • Scoring is determined by the point value given to the numbered zones on shuffleboard tables with points awarded only to the player that has the puck(s) deepest into the scoring area and beyond all the other player’s pucks.
    • A puck that hangs over the end of the playing surface, but does not fall into the gutter, is called a “hanger” and is awarded an additional point.
    • Only one player can score per round.
  • The subsequent round is performed in the opposite direction alternating ends until a player reaches either fifteen or twenty-one points 

Outdoor – Court

  • Shuffleboard is played in half-rounds. For each half-round, the players alternate using the cue to slide discs from the 10-Off section of one end of the court toward the scoring triangle at the other end.
  • Yellow plays first
  • Discs that don't reach the far dead line, or slide past the 10 Off section, are removed from play, as are those that are played illegally. The other discs stay in play.
  • The goal is to score points with your own discs while knocking your opponent’s discs into the 10 Off area or keep him from scoring.
  • Scoring:
    • Scores are tallied at the end of each half-round.
  • Players get the marked number of points for any disc fully within a section of the scoring triangle.
  • Discs that rest on a line are not scored.
  • Deduct 10 points for any disc that sits within the 10 Off area.
  • The game continues until one player reaches 75 points.
  • Once that happens, play continues until the end of the half-round. If the other player also reaches or exceeds 75 points, the one with the highest score at the end of the half-round wins.

Volleyball: Can be played in the pool or the outdoor beach court by the lake and generally played with 6 players per team – 3 people in the front row and 3 in the back row

Outcomes:

  • Improved physical health; hand eye coordination, improved balance, improved reaction time
  • Encourages coming together with friends/family
  • Strategic planning
  • Improved concentration
  • Mindfulness and stress management

How to:

  • After the serve, front line players may switch positions at the net
  • Maximum of three hits per side
  • Player may not hit the ball twice in succession (A block is not considered a hit)
  • Ball may be played off the net during a volley and on a serve
  • A ball hitting a boundary line is in
  • A ball is out if it hits the floor completely outside the court, the referee stand or pole, the ceiling above a nonplayable area
  • It is legal to contact the ball with any part of a players body
  • It is illegal to catch, hold, or throw the ball
  • If two or more players contact the ball at the same time, it is considered one play and either player involved may make the next contact (provided the next contact isn’t the teams 4th hit)
  • A player cannot block or attack a serve from on or inside the 10 foot line
  • Scoring:
    • Matches are made up of sets; the number depends on level of play
    • 3-set matches are 2 sets to 25 points and a third set to 15
    • Each set must be won by two points
    • The winner is the first team to win 2 sets
    • 5-set matches are 4 sets to 25 points and fifth set to 15
    • The team must win by 2 unless tournament rules dictate otherwise
    • The winner is the first team to win three sets

 

 

 


       
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